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Jeff Woolsey - My Last Night In Town (CD)
17,95 €
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14,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(2013/ShuffleOne) 14 tracks (36:44) Traditional Country Dancehall Music - Highlight!***** - Jeff Woolsey was raised on traditional country music in the honkytonks, on the North side of Houston, Texas. He spent many Saturday nights listening to his step-dad’s band play all the great songs from Ray Price, Johnny Bush, George Jones, Mel Tillis, Faron Young and the many other great country music artists from the ‘50’s,‘60’s and ‘70’s. Jeff would sit on the side of the stage and watch as all of the dancers would pass by him and when one song was over…they would stand in the middle of the dance floor waiting for the next tune. Jeff sang his first song when he was four years old….Charley Pride’s, ´´Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone”. From that moment on…he was hooked on singing and hooked on country music. He couldn’t wait until the next Saturday night when he could do it all over again.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 15.02.2018
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Max Greger´s Dance Orchester - Strict Tempo Dan...
9,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(1963/Polydor) Original 4track EP 21 621 EPH​ STRICT TEMPO DANCING Side A: IF I LOVED YOU (Rodgers) TWO IN A BIG CITY (Kollo) (Zwei in einer grossen Stadt) Side B: STRANGER ON THE SHORE (Bilk) LOVE IS HERE TO STAY (Gershwin) MAX GREGER´S DANCE ORCHESTRA SLOW FOXTROT The Slow Foxtrot is not only the most beautiful of all ballroom dances with its gliding, elegant steps, but also the most difficult to dance. In order to perform it properly it is necessary to have a lot of room on the dance floor — something that is hard to come by in these days of crowded ballrooms. The stance for the Slow Foxtrot is — as in the other so-called ´´English´´ dances, the Waltz and the Quickstep — erect with the shoulders completely relaxed. The main characteristic of Slow Foxtrot music is the fluidity that ´´carries´´ the dancers so that their steps flow effortlessly and one figure merges into the next without any rough edges. SLOW FOXTROT This Long Play Microgroove Record can be played only on 45 RPM instruments with a cartridge with microsaphire which puts a pressure of about 8-10 grammes on the record or with a special stereo cartridge of 5-6 grammes. — Printed in Germany —

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 15.02.2018
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The Shirelles & King Curtis - Give A Twist Part...
26,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(2013/SUNDAZED) 11 tracks Stereo, 1962 Scepter album in stunning souind quality! Twist And Groove withe the Shirelles and King Curtis! In 1962, the twist was everywhere. Artists from Joey Dee to Frank Sinatra were all chasing the craze, feverishly recording twist-able platters to meet the dance floor demand. Saxophone great King Curtis didn’t sleep on the trend, scoring a major hit with ´Soul Twist´ along with several other twist-themed singles. Thus, it was only natural that he should team up with the country’s Number one girl group, The Shirelles, themselves in the middle of an incredible run of chart-topping singles. This inspired pairing resulted in the Shirelles’ second LP release of 1962, The Shirelles and King Curtis Give a Twist Party. And what a party it is! The album’s eleven tracks mix scorching instrumentals with vocal numbers, never once stopping for air. Curtis’ gritty sax tone combines with The Shirelles’ dulcet harmonies for a one-of-a-kind sound that will have everyone in the house on their feet, wearing through shoe leather. Sourced from the original Scepter analog master, this Sundazed reissue is destined to become a ´go to´ LP for your next soirée. Because when The Shirelles and King Curtis Give a Twist Party, the only acceptable RSVP is ´Yes´!

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 17.02.2018
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Various - For Collector´s Only (2-CD)
39,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(Collectables) 40 tracks - I started collecting records when my parents bought me a Stromberg Carlson record player for my 13th birthday in 1956. I remember going to downtown Brooklyn to the record shop next to the Fox Theater and buying my first three records, ´´3 for S2.´´ They were ´´A Thousand Miles Away´´ by the Heartbeats on the Rama label, ´´In The Still Of The Night´´´´ by The Five Satins on the Ember label, and ´´Story Untold´´ by the Nutmegs on the Herald label. That was the beginning . . . For the next five years I accumulated thousands of records, probably 98% of these were vocal groups. I remember traveling up to Manhattan every Saturday with my friend Marty Dorfman, going to every record shop we could find that sold 45´s especially the ones that sold them 10 for $1.00. If I came across any group record that I didn´t have. I bought it. We would first hit the 3 or 4 stores on 42nd Street, then we would walk up to Zeiglers and the other two stores on 6th Avenue between 45th and 46th Streets, then down to Slim´s, a costume jewelery shop on 43rd Street between 6th and 7th Avenue. He always had great group records in the back of the store, and probably not too many collectors knew about him. Between Slim´s and Zeigler´s I probably got half of my collection. Sometime in 1958 Slim´s closed and I didn´t see him again until the summer of 1959, when he re-opened in the subway entrance of the Times Square Building at 1475 Broadway. I remember that day well. I must have bought 300 records. The only thing wrong was I didn´t have the money tp pay for all of them. I worked a deal out with Slim whereby, he would pay me what would be the equivalent of 75( an hour in records. The following two years at Times Square Records afforded me the opportunity to pick the cream of the crop when it came to originals. I could probably fill up a thousand album jackets talking about my experiences at Times Square Records with Slim, Arlene, his wife, Harold Ginsberg, Johnny Esposito, Al Trommers, Jenny and her sister, Alan Fredericks and of course the famous Raccoon (his pet). This album probably would be considered the cream of the crop back then. In putting it together, I aimed it to the serious record collector. The first record on side one by the Hideaways, ´´Can´t Help Loving That Girl Of Mine,´´ was in my collection, and I had the only known copy back then. On a trip to Philadelphia in 1959 I found it on the second floor of Treegoobs Record Shop in an old chest lying flat between two slats. I remember I almost broke it trying to get it out. After listening to it, it was well worth the 100 I paid for it. From what I understand, it is in Val Shivley´s collection today. I have seen it listed in a book of the most expensive rarities, and they had it listed as the most expensive oldie of all times at $5,000. I guess by now you should have the picture. If you have all these records on this album. on the original labels, you would have at least $25.000 worth of records. With part of my collection and duplicates I accumulated in those five years, I was able to open a record store in Philadelphia (Record Museum). At one point in its 20 year existence we had over twenty stores dealing with oldies. Now, my wife Nina and I collect record masters. We´ve put over 1100 records on the ´´Collectables´´ label with a lot more to follow. There are many records that we´ve put out that have not been profitable, about 3/4 of the ones on this album fit this category. We feel that if we didn´t release them they would never see the light of day. Being a serious collector, money is not always the factor. This CD probably is not going to be profitable for us but in my opinion these selections are truly the beginning of the oldies. And I probably wouldn´t be doing what I´m doing today if it had not been for the kind of music on this CD. (Jerry Greene)

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 17.02.2018
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Elvis Presley - Charro! (Book&CD)
49,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(2006/JAT) 23x26 cm, color & b/w, 112 Seiten, Fotobuch (Broschur) auf hochwertigem Papier inkl. CD mit Radio Jingles und Interviews zum Film. Enthält Fotos der aus dem Film gestrichenen, damals nicht jugendfreien Szenen. Mittlerweile sehr seltenes Elvis Presley Sammlerstück! Neuware (Bear Family Records) The Making of CHARRO! and Selected Interviews By Bill Bram Filming for Charro! commenced on July 22 and was completed on August 28, 1968. Exteriors were shot at the Apacheland Movie Ranch1 in Apache Junction, AZ. Interior sequences, such as the sheriff´s office, the saloon and bedroom scenes, were filmed at what was then known as United Artists Studios.2 This was the third and last film Elvis would do at this Hollywood studio. The other two films he shot here were: Kid Galahad and Frankie and Johnny. While in Arizona the cast and crew stayed at the Superstition Inn. Elvis, his father Vemon, and the rest of his cronies stayed on the second floor. Colonel Parker, stayed in the hotel as well - at least for part of the filming. The director and writer, Charles Marquis Warren, watched dailies at the hotel, probably in one of the convention halls. Fans would hang out at the hotel in hopes of getting a glimpse of Elvis. Towards the end of location work, Elvis held an impromptu concert in the hotel bar for the movie company. He reportedly sang for well over an hour. In addition, when filming wrapped at the studio, a wrap party was held - and again Elvis performed, probably on one of the sets for the film. Charles Marquis Warren thought, after he had first heard Elvis sing in the fifties, that ´´he was a negro . . . the bits and pieces I heard him sing, he sounded like one.´´ When National General, the movie company that financed the picture, told Warren that Elvis had read his script, liked it and wanted to play the lead role, Warren was aghast. The people at National General urged Warren to, ´´Just meet him, maybe you´ll change your mind.´´ They were right. Elvis and Warren met, for the first time, at a restaurant next to United Artists Studios called The Formosa. To quote Warren, ´´I liked him a lot . . . we didn´t fall in love. He wanted to hear what I had to say. I wanted to hear what he had to say.´´ After lunch Warren took Elvis to Western Costume Company to try on some cowboy clothes. Warren picked out ´´a bunch of crummy clothes . . . a worn out shirt and pants, scuffed boots and a beaten up hat.´´ Elvis looked in the four way mirror and said in his typical modest way, ´´I like it, it it´s all right with you.´´ Warren thought Elvis looked great. Warren decided to put a beard on Elvis, to make him look more like a tough Western hero, but Elvis´s new look didn´t quite work; to quote Warren, ´´he looked like Jesus Christ.´´...

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 15.02.2018
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Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home (180g Edi...
26,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

Exact repro on 180 gram vinyl, with original art and liner notes Rare original mono mix, available for the first time in more than 30 years All-analog mastering from the original master tapes Say the phrase ´Dylan went electric´ to a rock music fan practically anywhere on the globe and they will instantly think of his infamous Newport Folk Festival appearance on July 20, 1965. It has become one of the most oft-told tales in modern musical mythology, with any number of versions depending on the teller. Did the crowd boo Dylan because he dared to plug in or were they merely upset at the short length of the three-song set´ Did Pete Seeger really grab an axe and try to cut the electrical umbilical cord´ Did the crowd even boo at all´ While we´re not likely to get a consensus on these issues, everyone agrees that Dylan signaled a bold new direction that day. Some hated it, many loved it but it forever changed Dylan´s approach to presenting his songs and, because of his unprecedented influence, the course of popular music in general. However, Dylan had already gone electric earlier that year. Returning to Columbia Studios on January 13. 1965 for a three-day recording session, he began work on his fifth album, Bringing It All Back Home. While half of the album would be recorded in his traditional acoustic style, one half would feature the backing of a full rock band. Producer Tom Wilson assembled a sympathetic group of session musicians, including John P. Hammond and Kenny Rankin on guitar, John Sebastian and John Lee on bass and Bobby Gregg on drums. This new, switched-on method was immediately apparent on the album´s opening track, ´Subterranean Homesick Blues.´ A tough, sinewy number, the band drives forward as Bob spits out phrases faster than the listener can interpret them. Hailed as both pre-punk and proto-rap, it reached #39 on the Billboard singles chart, giving Dylan his first Top Forty hit. It was later immortalized in an innovative scene in Don´t Look Back, D.A. Pennebaker´s documentary on Dylan. The tension eases on the next track, ´She Belongs to Me,´ which is practically a blueprint for the Velvet Underground´s quieter moments. The churning blues rocker ´Maggie´s Farm´ ups the ante again, with legions of Dylan watchers struggling to interpret its true meaning. Was it another rejection of the hidebound traditional folk crowd´ Was it a comment on racism, or perhaps an anti-war song´ The answers proved elusive yet seductively compelling. The rollercoaster of emotions continued through the album´s electrified Side One, with Dylan sounding extremely comfortable as a rock front man. The mostly solo acoustic Side Two is no less powerful, though. It opens with one of Dylan´s best-known songs, ´Mr. Tambourine Man.´ This is not the truncated, 4/4 version that the Byrds flew up the pop charts. In its creator´s hands, it is an in-depth character study, revealed through a series of cryptic couplets. At 7:29, ´It´s Alright Ma (I´m Only Bleeding)´ is the side´s epic, a song that Dylan lists among his favorites and one he returns to often in concert. Side Two closes with ´It´s All Over Now, Baby Blue,´ another song left open to intriguing interpretation. Whatever the true identity of ´Baby Blue,´ it became a favorite cover song with versions by the Byrds, the Animals, Joan Baez, the Chocolate Watch Band, the Thirteenth Floor Elevators, the Grateful Dead and many more. Bringing it All Back Home was also significant in that it was the first Dylan album to feature a structured cover portrait rather than a simple artist picture. Shot by photographer Daniel Kramer, it showed Dylan with Sally Grossman, wife of his manager Albert Grossman, lounging in the background, both of them surrounded by a variety of objects. In what would become a common practice, each item in the photograph was scrutinized for its possible meaning: a fallout shelter sign, a copy of Newsweek, cufflinks given to him by Baez, a cat... to the dedicated Dylan fan, it was all significant. Whether they were ´clues´ or just random props matters little in comparison to the groundbreaking album inside the jacket. Dylan was now letting his boot heels wander to beat of his own tambourine and nothing could stop him now. Sundazed is proud to present this seminal album in its rare mono form. It has been sourced directly from the original Columbia analog mono masters to provide a superior listening experience.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 15.02.2018
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